Monday, February 24, 2020

Understanding and carrying out health related behavior change Essay

Understanding and carrying out health related behavior change - Essay Example Data was collected through questionnaires and interviews. It is more accurate and private and the need to get quality feedback was the main reason for use of this method. The risks involved in this type of data analysis include the language barriers, as the natives were the target group. Financial problems and loss of contact between one group and another in form of communication were also reported. Use of different age and different ethnic groups together with relatives helped in reducing researcher bias. The data method was appropriate with the type of research conducted for this findings. The author identifies some difficulties encountered in the process of research such as language barrier and high cost condition to conduct the research. Data management practices included correlation and comparison with other journals from the internet and other sources. The findings did not address the whole purpose of the study since the study was restricted only the data was partially analyzed. Interpretations did not reflect the true findings even though reported change on healthy lifestyles was reported. Some of the variations were explained as the difference between men and women in Muslim religion and cultural beliefs on some types of food consumed. The findings came up with the information on beliefs and cultures on some food influence healthy development while the religion factor, e specially on women, also is different with other journals of research.

Friday, February 7, 2020

Organizational Behavior Case Study Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 words

Organizational Behavior - Case Study Example A meeting was conducted with senior leadership at the law firm to discuss which of the three nominated employees should actually make partner. In this meeting, different attitudes regarding certain human resources policies were quite mixed as were the reactions from the attending leaders about which employees could provide the most long-term value in the role of partner. The main issue in this case is that there is a lack of unity when it comes to decision-making regarding who to elect as partner in the group. This is an organizational culture where policy is open to multitudes of different interpretations and nobody seems to have a clear handle on how these policies should be communicated regarding promotion opportunities. For example, the part-time employee up for partner nomination was not necessarily informed that moving to part-time status would impact her potential for reaching partner. None of the senior leaders can seem to agree on whether this is beneficial for the business long-term or whether it actually causes more harm in areas of corporate employee dedication. There are concerns within the senior leadership group that promoting Julie, the part-time employee in question, could set a policy precedent which gives too much flexibility to part-time staffers and could impact their ability to effectively carry out the role of partner. This di vision at senior leadership level is noticeable at the colleague level and at the employee level when they have access to read the meeting minutes. In terms of organizational behavior and culture, the lack of senior leadership unity regarding policy creation and implementation and their belief about how human resources impacts the business creates a culture of division. The process of promoting an individual to partner also seems to be ritualistic at the senior level, where they feel they must perform this annual

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Pharmacology and Medical Treatment Essay Example for Free

Pharmacology and Medical Treatment Essay Relating course content to the current health care environment is an integral part of your learning. Two (2) application papers are required in this course. These short papers will give you the opportunity to apply course content. They should be approximately 500 words in length each (2 pages). The topics for these two papers are noted below. Refer to at least one outside source in addition to your text as you prepare each of these papers. Application Paper One: New Pharmaceuticals Application Paper Two: Pain Medications The body of the papers should be approximately 500 words (2 pages); there should also be a title page and a reference page. Papers that are too brief or too verbose could be subject to large point deductions. The papers should be uploaded into the appropriate Dropbox. The file should be named [LastName]AP1.doc or [LastName]AP2.doc respectively. Use APA guidelines. APA requires double-spacing, but I will allow 1 ½ spacing if desired. All sources must be cited in APA format. The full reference should be found at the end of the paper. Links to APA reference guidelines are presented at the end of the course syllabus and an interactive tutorial is located in Week 3. Application Paper 1 (Due Week 4): New Pharmaceuticals TCO 2 deals with new experimental drugs and the steps required to bring new drugs to market. The first application paper deals with this as well. Describe the steps that are required to bring a new pharmaceutical to market. Address topics like human testing, the role of the FDA in approving new drugs, and the cost incurred by drug companies when developing new drugs. Application Paper 2 (Due Week 7): Pain Medications Your first paragraph needs to outline the different types of drug to relieve pain. Then, you ONLY select ONE type of pain medication to describe the mechanism of drug action (Pharmacology) and the therapeutic efficacy. Furthermore, you need to discuss the adverse effects, abuse potential, and  toxicities of such type of drug (if applicable). Finally, you will describe your opinion of using such type of pain medication. The two topic papers are worth 140 points (70 points each) and represent 14% of your total grade. Each paper will be graded on the following: Content50 points Grammar/spelling10 points References/citations10 points Based on the following criteria: Content (double points for this category) 1. The paper fulfills the purpose of the assignment as described in the syllabus and in this document (up to 10 points) 2. The introduction leads logically to the main idea or thesis (up to 10 points) 3. Supporting evidence is developed and analyzed sufficiently (up to 10 points) 4. Conclusion provides insightful closure (up to 10 points) 5. The content flows logically and demonstrates an understanding of the topic (up to 10 points) Grammar/Spelling 1. Sentences are grammatically correct (noun/verb agreement, punctuation, sentence structure, etc.) (up to 5 points) 2. Spelling is correct (e.g., homonyms used correctly, no misspellings) (up to 5 points) References/citations 1. Sources are cited in the body of the paper using APA format (up to 5 points) 2. Reference list is included with the paper that lists only sources cited in the document (up to 5 points) Points will be awarded for each criterion on the following scale: 5 points = few or no weaknesses found; writer satisfies the criteria with distinction 4 points = strengths outweigh the weaknesses; writer shows sound understanding of criteria 3 points = strengths and weaknesses are about equal; writer shows awareness of criteria 2 points = weaknesses outweighs strengths;  writer shows limited understanding of criteria 1 point = weaknesses far outweigh strengths; writer does not show understanding of criteria Five points (5) will be deducted for each the following: No title page included Name is not on title page or in document Insufficient number of sources cited (must have at least one in addition to the course textbook) Please refer to DeVry’s Academic Integrity Policy located in the Policies Tab under Course Home in the online classroom. Any suspected violation of the Academic Integrity Policy will be handled according to the policy.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

The Sun Will Rise Over Moldova :: Personal Narrative Writing

The Sun Will Rise Over Moldova It is 5:30 in the morning, and I still fill like I am dreaming. The officer asks for my Passport, I give it to him and look back. My mother with her face wet with tears says something, but the words do not reach me. I have to move on, but I know this is a moment of extreme importance in my life. Somebody by my side tells an anecdote; everybody is laughing, but I felt deep in my thoughts. My flight to New York is in less than 30 minutes. Moldova is a small developing country in South-central Europe. Its economy is in transition from a command to a market economy, and the life of the society is directly associated with the fluctuations in financial need. People have a hard time. Sometimes there is no heat in winter, or the salary is not paid on time. There are limited energy resources, so it is common not to have electricity certain hours or gas for cooking. It is strange for people to think it is better somewhere, and the movies and TV shows about the United States seem like a far, impossible reality. I dreamed about it. In this environment some years ago a few foundations established in Moldova, and they provide a free cultural exchange for high school students. They have their goals to teach the youth about a better system of life arrangements, which can be brought to life in Moldova, too. The country of freedom, democracy, and economical wealth was not so far now. I was one of those willing to see the new continent, and I knew that all the efforts are worth it. I forced myself to be better, involved myself in many activities, and began studying English intensively, because I knew it would not be easy to achieve the goal. Every year thousands of students enter the contest, but only 20 or 30 receive the funding. In 1996 I entered the contest supervised by FSA ( Freedom Support Act ) and founded by the Congress of the United States of America. After 6 month of tests, essays, and intense emotions I did not win the contest. I was disappointed and ready to quit, but I did not. It was not finished yet. T he next year my name was on the contestants' list again. I applied for two scholarships, the FSA and the Soros Foundation. The Sun Will Rise Over Moldova :: Personal Narrative Writing The Sun Will Rise Over Moldova It is 5:30 in the morning, and I still fill like I am dreaming. The officer asks for my Passport, I give it to him and look back. My mother with her face wet with tears says something, but the words do not reach me. I have to move on, but I know this is a moment of extreme importance in my life. Somebody by my side tells an anecdote; everybody is laughing, but I felt deep in my thoughts. My flight to New York is in less than 30 minutes. Moldova is a small developing country in South-central Europe. Its economy is in transition from a command to a market economy, and the life of the society is directly associated with the fluctuations in financial need. People have a hard time. Sometimes there is no heat in winter, or the salary is not paid on time. There are limited energy resources, so it is common not to have electricity certain hours or gas for cooking. It is strange for people to think it is better somewhere, and the movies and TV shows about the United States seem like a far, impossible reality. I dreamed about it. In this environment some years ago a few foundations established in Moldova, and they provide a free cultural exchange for high school students. They have their goals to teach the youth about a better system of life arrangements, which can be brought to life in Moldova, too. The country of freedom, democracy, and economical wealth was not so far now. I was one of those willing to see the new continent, and I knew that all the efforts are worth it. I forced myself to be better, involved myself in many activities, and began studying English intensively, because I knew it would not be easy to achieve the goal. Every year thousands of students enter the contest, but only 20 or 30 receive the funding. In 1996 I entered the contest supervised by FSA ( Freedom Support Act ) and founded by the Congress of the United States of America. After 6 month of tests, essays, and intense emotions I did not win the contest. I was disappointed and ready to quit, but I did not. It was not finished yet. T he next year my name was on the contestants' list again. I applied for two scholarships, the FSA and the Soros Foundation.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Zoe’s Tale PART I Chapter One

The flying saucer landed on our front yard and a little green man got out of it. It was the flying saucer that got my attention. Green men aren't actually unheard of where I come from. All the Colonial Defense Forces were green; it's part of the genetic engineering they do on them to help them fight better. Chlorophyll in the skin gives them the extra energy they need for truly first-class alien stomping. We didn't get many Colonial Defense Force soldiers on Huckleberry, the colony I lived on; it was an established colony and we hadn't been seriously attacked in a couple of decades. But the Colonial Union goes out of its way to let every colonist know all about the CDF, and I knew more about them than most. But the flying saucer, well. That's novel. New Goa is a farming community. Tractors and harvesters and animal-drawn wagons, and wheeled public buses when we wanted to live life on the edge and visit the provincial capital. An actual flying transport was a rare thing indeed. Having one small enough for a single passenger land on our lawn was definitely not an everyday occurrence. â€Å"Would you like Dickory and me to go out and meet him?† asked Hickory. We watched from inside the house as the green man pulled himself out of the transport. I looked over at Hickory. â€Å"Do you think he's an actual threat? I think if he wanted to attack us, he could have just dropped a rock on the house while he was flying over it.† â€Å"I am always for prudence,† Hickory said. The unsaid portion of that sentence was when you are involved. Hickory is very sweet, and paranoid. â€Å"Let's try the first line of defense instead,† I said, and walked over to the screen door. Babar the mutt was standing at it, his front paws up on the door, cursing the genetic fate that left him without opposable thumbs or the brains to pull the door instead of pushing on it. I opened the door for him; he took off like a furry heat-seeking slobber missile. To the green man's credit, he took a knee and greeted Babar like an old friend, and was generously coated in dog drool for his pains. â€Å"Good thing he's not soluble,† I said to Hickory. â€Å"Babar is not a very good watchdog,† Hickory said, as it watched the green man play with my dog. â€Å"No, he's really not,† I agreed. â€Å"But if you ever need something really moistened, he's got you covered.† â€Å"I will remember that for future reference,† Hickory said, in that noncommittal way designed for dealing with my sarcasm. â€Å"Do that,† I said, and opened the door again. â€Å"And stay in here for now, please.† â€Å"As you say, Zoe,† Hickory said. â€Å"Thanks,† I said, and walked out to the porch. By this time the green man had gotten to the porch steps, Babar bouncing behind him. â€Å"I like your dog,† he said to me. â€Å"I see that,† I said. â€Å"The dog's only so-so about you.† â€Å"How can you tell?† he asked. â€Å"You're not completely bathed in saliva,† I said. He laughed. â€Å"I'll try harder next time,† he said. â€Å"Remember to bring a towel,† I said. The green man motioned to the house. â€Å"This is Major Perry's house?† â€Å"I hope so,† I said. â€Å"All his stuff is here.† This earned me about a two-second pause. Yes, as it happens, I am a sarcastic little thing. Thanks for asking. It comes from living with my dad all these years. He considers himself quite the wit; I don't know how I feel about that one, personally, but I will say that it's made me pretty forward when it comes to comebacks and quips. Give me a soft lob, I'll be happy to spike it. I think it's endearing and charming; so does Dad. We may be in the minority with that opinion. If nothing else it's interesting to see how other people react to it. Some people think it's cute. Others not so much. I think my green friend fell into the â€Å"not so much† camp, because his response was to change the subject. â€Å"I'm sorry,† he said. â€Å"I don't think I know who you are.† â€Å"I'm Zoe,† I said. â€Å"Major Perry's daughter. Lieutenant Sagan's, too.† â€Å"Oh, right,† he said. â€Å"I'm sorry. I pictured you as younger.† â€Å"I used to be,† I said. â€Å"I should have known you were his daughter,† he said. â€Å"You look like him in the eyes.† Fight the urge, the polite part of my brain said. Fight it. Just let it go. â€Å"Thank you,† I said. â€Å"I'm adopted.† My green friend stood there for a minute, doing that thing people do when they've just stepped in it: freezing and putting a smile on their face while their brain strips its gears trying to figure how it's going to extract itself out of this faux pas. If I leaned in, I could probably hear his frontal lobes go click click click click, trying to reset. See, now, that was just mean, said the polite part of my brain. But come on. If the guy was calling Dad â€Å"Major Perry,† then he probably knew when Dad was discharged from service, which was eight years ago. CDF soldiers can't make babies; that's part of their combat-effective genetic engineering, don't you know – no accidental kids – so his earliest opportunity to spawn would have been when they put him in a new, regular body at the end of his service term. And then there's the whole â€Å"nine months gestation† thing. I might have been a little small for my age when I was fifteen, but I assure you, I didn't look seven. Honestly, I think there's a limit to how bad I should feel in a situation like that. Grown men should be able to handle a little basic math. Still, there's only so long you can leave someone on the hook. â€Å"You called Dad ‘Major Perry,'† I said. â€Å"Did you know him from the service?† â€Å"I did,† he said, and seemed happy that the conversation was moving forward again. â€Å"It's been a while, though. I wonder if I'll recognize him.† â€Å"I imagine he looks the same,† I said. â€Å"Maybe a different skin tone.† He chuckled at that. â€Å"I suppose that's true,† he said. â€Å"Being green would make it a little more difficult to blend in.† â€Å"I don't think he would ever quite blend in here,† I said, and then immediately realized all the very many ways that statement could be misinterpreted. And of course, my visitor wasted no time doing just that. â€Å"Does he not blend?† he asked, and then bent down to pat Babar. â€Å"That's not what I meant,† I said. â€Å"Most of the people here at Huckleberry are from India, back on Earth, or were born here from people who came from India. It's a different culture than the one he grew up in, that's all.† â€Å"I understand,† the green man said. â€Å"And I'm sure he gets along very well with the people here. Major Perry is like that. I'm sure that's why he has the job he has here.† My dad's job was as an ombudsman, someone who helps people cut through government bureaucracy. â€Å"I guess I'm just curious if he likes it here.† â€Å"What do you mean?† I asked. â€Å"I was just wondering how he's been enjoying his retirement from the universe, is all,† he said, and looked back up at me. In the back of my brain something went ping. I was suddenly aware that our nice and casual conversation had somehow become something less casual. Our green visitor wasn't just here for a social call. â€Å"I think he likes it fine,† I said, and kept from saying anything else. â€Å"Why?† â€Å"Just curious,† he said, petting Babar again. I fought off the urge to call my dog over. â€Å"Not everyone makes the jump from military life to civilian life perfectly.† He looked around. â€Å"This looks like a pretty sedate life. It's a pretty big switch.† â€Å"I think he likes it just fine,† I repeated, putting enough emphasis on the words that unless my green visitor was an absolute toad, he'd know to move on. â€Å"Good,† he said. â€Å"What about you? How do you like it here?† I opened my mouth to respond, and then shut it just as quickly. Because, well. There was a question. The idea of living on a human colony is more exciting than the reality. Some folks new to the concept think that people out in the colonies go from planet to planet all the time, maybe living on one planet, working on another and then having vacations on a third: the pleasure planet of Vacationaria, maybe. The reality is, sadly, far more boring. Most colonists live their whole lives on their home planet, and never get out to see the rest of the universe. It's not impossible to go from planet to planet, but there's usually a reason for it: You're a member of the crew on a trade ship, hauling fruit and wicker baskets between the stars, or you get a job with the Colonial Union itself and start a glorious career as an interstellar bureaucrat. If you're an athlete, there's the Colonial Olympiad every four years. And occasionally a famous musician or actor will do a grand tour of the colonies. But mostly, you're born on a planet, you live on a planet, you die on a planet, and your ghost hangs around and annoys your descendants on that planet. I don't suppose there's really anything bad about that – I mean, most people don't actually go more than a couple dozen kilometers from their homes most of the time in day-to-day life, do they? And people hardly see most of their own planet when they do decide to wander off. If you've never seen the sights on your own planet, I don't know how much you can really complain about not seeing a whole other planet. But it helps to be on an interesting planet. In case this ever gets back to Huckleberry: I love Huckleberry, really I do. And I love New Goa, the little town where we lived. When you're a kid, a rural, agriculturally-based colony town is a lot of fun to grow up in. It's life on a farm, with goats and chickens and fields of wheat and sorghum, harvest celebrations and winter festivals. There's not an eight- or nine-year-old kid who's been invented who doesn't find all of that unspeakably fun. But then you become a teenager and you start thinking about everything you might possibly want to do with your life, and you look at the options available to you. And then all farms, goats and chickens – and all the same people you've known all your life and will know all your life – begin to look a little less than optimal for a total life experience. It's all still the same, of course. That's the point. It's you who's changed. I know this bit of teenage angst wouldn't make me any different than any other small-town teenager who has ever existed throughout the history of the known universe. But when even the â€Å"big city† of a colony – the district capital of Missouri City – holds all the mystery and romance of watching compost, it's not unreasonable to hope for something else. I'm not saying that there's anything wrong with Missouri City (there's nothing wrong with compost, either; you actually need it). Maybe it's better to say it's the sort of place you come back to, once you've gone out and had your time in the big city, or the big bad universe. One of the things I know about Mom is that she loved it on Huckleberry. But before she was here, she was a Special Forces soldier. She doesn't talk too much about all the things she's seen and done, but from personal experience I know a little bit about it. I can't imagine a whole life of it. I think she'd say that she'd seen enough of the universe. I've seen some of the universe, too, before we came to Huckleberry. But unlike Jane – unlike Mom – I don't think I'm ready to say Huckleberry's all I want out of a life. But I wasn't sure I wanted to say any of that to this green guy, who I had become suddenly rather suspicious of. Green men falling from the sky, asking after the psychological states of various family members including oneself, are enough to make a girl paranoid about what's going on. Especially when, as I suddenly realized, I didn't actually get the guy's name. He'd gotten this far into my family life without actually saying who he was. Maybe this was just something he'd innocently managed to overlook – this wasn't a formal interview, after all – but enough bells were ringing in my head that I decided that my green friend had had enough free information for one day. Green man was looking at me intently, waiting for me to respond. I gave him my best noncommittal shrug. I was fifteen years old. It's a quality age for shrugging. He backed off a bit. â€Å"I don't suppose your dad is home,† he said. â€Å"Not yet,† I said. I checked my PDA and showed it to him. â€Å"His workday finished up a few minutes ago. He and Mom are probably walking home.† â€Å"Okay. And your mom is constable here, right?† â€Å"Right,† I said. Jane Sagan, frontier law woman. Minus the frontier. It fit her. â€Å"Did you know Mom, too?† I asked. Special Forces was an entirely different thing from regular infantry. â€Å"Just by reputation,† he said, and again there was that studied casual thing. Folks, a little tip: Nothing is more transparent than you try for casual and miss. My green friend was missing it by a klick, and I got tired of feeling lightly groped for information. â€Å"I think I'll go for a walk,† I said. â€Å"Mom and Dad are probably right down the road. I'll let them know you're here.† â€Å"I'll go with you,† Green man offered. â€Å"That's all right,† I said, and motioned him onto the porch, and to our porch swing. â€Å"You've been traveling. Have a seat and relax.† â€Å"All right,† he said. â€Å"If you're comfortable having me here while you're gone.† I think that was meant as a joke. I smiled at him. â€Å"I think it'll be fine,† I said. â€Å"You'll have company.† â€Å"You're leaving me the dog,† he said. He sat. â€Å"Even better,† I said. â€Å"I'm leaving you two of my friends.† This is when I called into the house for Hickory and Dickory, and then stood away from the door and watched my visitor, so I wouldn't miss his expression when the two of them came out. He didn't quite wet his pants. Which was an accomplishment, all things considered. Obin – which is what Hickory and Dickory are – don't look exactly like a cross between a spider and a giraffe, but they're close enough to make some part of the human brain fire up the drop ballast alert. You get used to them after a bit. But the point is it takes a while. â€Å"This is Hickory,† I said, pointing to the one at the left of me, and then pointed to the one at my right. â€Å"And this is Dickory. They're Obin.† â€Å"Yes, I know,† my visitor said, with the sort of tone you'd expect from a very small animal trying to pretend that being cornered by a pair of very large predators was not that big of a deal. â€Å"Uh. So. These are your friends.† â€Å"Best friends,† I said, with what I felt was just the right amount of brainless gush. â€Å"And they love to entertain visitors. They'll be happy to keep you company while I go look for my parents. Isn't that right?† I said to Hickory and Dickory. â€Å"Yes,† they said, together. Hickory and Dickory are fairly monotone to begin with; having them be monotone in stereo offers an additional – and delightful! – creepy effect. â€Å"Please say hello to our guest,† I said. â€Å"Hello,† they said, again in stereo. â€Å"Uh,† said Green man. â€Å"Hi.† â€Å"Great, everybody's friends,† I said, and stepped off the porch. Babar left our green friend to follow me. â€Å"I'm off, then.† â€Å"You sure you don't want me to come along?† Green man said. â€Å"I don't mind.† â€Å"No, please,† I said. â€Å"I don't want you to feel like you have to get up for anything.† My eyes sort of casually flicked over at Hickory and Dickory, as if to imply it would be a shame if they had to make steaks out of him. â€Å"Great,† he said, and settled onto the swing. I think he got the hint. See, that's how you do studied casual. â€Å"Great,† I said. Babar and I headed off down the road to find my folks.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Major Theme in to Build a Fire by Jack London - 1360 Words

Major Themes Determinism The movement of naturalism was greatly influenced by the 19th-century ideas of Social Darwinism, which was in turn influenced by Charles Darwins theories on evolution. Social Darwinism applied to the human environment the evolutionary concept that natural environments alter an organisms biological makeup over time through natural selection. Social Darwinists and naturalists cited this as proof that organisms, including humans, do not have free will, but are shaped, or determined, by their environment and biology. Naturalists argued that the deterministic world is based on a series of links, each of which causes the next (for more on these causal links, see Causal links and processes, below). In To Build a†¦show more content†¦He has also ignored advice about avoiding the cold, not thinking ahead to what might happen in such harsh conditions. This deficit hurts him most when he builds the fire under the spruce tree; he does not think ahead that he might capsize the trees load of snow and snuff out the fire. Only by the end of the story, when he is near death, does he mentally process causal links, thinking about his own death and how others might come across his body. The ability to process these mental causal links is the only way one can be held responsible for his actions in naturalism (see Amorality and responsibility, above). Since the man does not make these mental links, he is not fully responsible for the accidents that befall him. Instinct over intellectualism Though the man is hardly an intellectual, he exercises intellectual properties more than instinctive ones. He uses complicated tools (matches) to build a fire; he understand how cold it is through temperature readings; he identifies where he is (Henderson Creek, the Yukon) through language on a map. The dog, on the other hand, is pure instinct. It remains warm through its fur coat or by burrowing into the snow; it has an innate understanding of the cold and its dangers; it could not point out its location on a map, but it knows by scent where to find the nearby camp with men. In the Yukon, instinct is far superior to intellect. The mans intellectShow MoreRelatedJack London : An Oyster Pirate1204 Words   |  5 PagesJack London was born in 1876, and died in 1916. He was born in San Francisco, California, and was the son of Flora Wellman Chaney. When he was a child, he would sometimes living with the Prentisses. Mr. and Mrs. Prentisses were African Americans who served as London†™s surrogate parents. When Jack turned 15, he sailed the San Francisco Bay as an oyster pirate. During his time on the water, London developed an alcohol problem, which would eventually become alcoholism. In 1894, London was arrested asRead MoreJack London Essay1251 Words   |  6 PagesJack London, an American author known for his thrilling adventure stories, showed the world that even an exciting story that takes place in exotic settings can include all the intricacies of great literature. This is seen in many of his stories with the implementation of symbolism, many times a recurring theme in his work. Also, London used many ideas of the day such as Darwinism and Spencerism in his writings in order to better portray his views. However, perhaps one of the most telling signs thatRead MoreA Comparison of Jack London and Stephen Crane.1481 Words   |  6 PagesA Comparison of Jack London and Stephen Crane. Jack London and Stephen Crane were both well-known literary naturalists who died at relatively early ages. Despite having lived such a short life, Jack London lived a full life. 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The writers turned to research and the harsh realities of the universeRead MoreAn Analysis Of To Build A Fire By Jack London1673 Words   |  7 Pagesthe story To Build a Fire written by Jack London, a man and a dog travel together through the Yukon in freezing temperatures to get to a cabin where the man’s friends are. The significant events in the story include the man falling into a creek, the man’s fire going out and the dog leaving the mans body reveal the authors’ own understanding of how nature and humanity interact. The use of third person point of view and symbolism work together in order to help readers understand the themes that natureRead MoreThe Theme of Lord of the Flies Essay930 Words   |  4 Pagesrespectablequot; (Baker, 1965). nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;The major theme that Golding develops in Lord of the Flies is the deterioration of rules and order in a lawless environment. Deterioration is the reduction of value and quality that may result in chaos. In this novel, the rules that are made are quickly broken or forgotten. Through the course of the novel, this statement becomes evident with the neglecting of the shelters, when Jack allows the fire to burn out, and the change in character of Roger. EachRead MoreNaturalism : The Great. Who Has Read American Literature1368 Words   |  6 Pagessome consider naturalism to be stereotypical and one-dimensional, naturalism remains an important literary genre in American literature today because of it’s ability to turn from a literary movement to a literary genre and it’s popular novelists and major characteristics remain front and center in American literature today. Emile Zola created the term naturalism. Zola was a French novelist who sought a new and modern way of convincing his readers of his fiction (Zhang 196). According to Xiaofen ZhangRead MoreNaturalism As A Literary Genre1367 Words   |  6 Pagessome consider naturalism to be stereotypical and one-dimensional, naturalism remains an important literary genre in American literature today because of it’s ability to turn from a literary movement to a literary genre and it’s popular novelists and major characteristics remain front and center in American literature today. Emile Zola created the term naturalism. Zola was a French novelist who sought a new and modern way of convincing his readers of his fiction (Zhang 196). According to Xiaofen ZhangRead MoreThe Theme Of A Fire By Jack London794 Words   |  4 Pages The theme â€Å"To Build a Fire† by Jack London, is about pride, which is shown by survival in the wilderness, taking advice, and inevitably death. Pride is a major part of survival, especially in environments such as in Yukon, Alaska. When advice is given to you, it’s meant to help you or to save your life. Sometimes you have to learn the hard way when you don’t listen to advice, such as did the main character in the Alaska extreme cold weather. Formatively, you have to ask yourself; will you liveRead MoreNaturalism Literary Period2601 Words   |  11 Pageshumanistic themes from these literary works. Naturalists utilize mundane monotonous lives and reveal the heroine within, when all (environment, opportunities, intuition) seems out of control. This type of literature was found relatable during the rapid urbanization and naturalization after the Civil War, where many in bustling developing cities suffered from poverty and its poorly prevented consequences. The American naturalist movement was important due to the introduction of themes involving popular

Friday, December 27, 2019

Designing A New Computer System - 1225 Words

Case Study 1 Three friends have asked me to configure a new computer for each one of them. The first one is a gamer, and she needs a competitive gaming system. Another wants to purchase a computer for her home office where she has a small travel agency company, and the third would like a notebook or laptop computer that he can use for schoolwork. Each one of my friends has a $2000.00 budget to create the perfect computer system for each of their needs. First, we will create the perfect gaming system for my friend in need. With the gaming system we will be starting from scratch. First things first, obtain an AMD FX6350 6 core processor. It is able to run games at high settings, and there is not much difference between AMD’s and Intel’s in†¦show more content†¦The two have been tested against one another, and honestly there is really not much different between the two in game playing performances. However, the SSD has proven to be drastically faster than the HD. I am going to go with the SSD with this gaming system because it loads faster, transitioning maps throughout the game is significantly faster, and overall it means that your computer will boot at a significantly faster. Overall one would have a better experience because it makes the overall functionality of the computer better as a whole. The Samsung 840 EVO 240 GB would be a great one to choose. It can be found for $129.99. It is a little on the pricey side, but it will be well worth it. Next we need to configure a reliable computer system for my friend that has a small, at home travel agency. With this system I would also recommend buying an already made system, and perhaps doing a few upgrades. Dell has the OptiPlex 3020 Micro which is a descent system for an at home business. It comes with an Intel Pentium G3240T Processor which is dual-core with HD Graphics. This dual-core processor has plenty of horsepower to work with for a small business, so there is really no need in upgrading this to a quad-core processor. It will allow you to answer e-mails while running Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, along with the Web browser. It also comes with 4 gigabytes of RAM, and there is